Predators at my Window: The Recovery of Predator Populations in Southern New England

” We long for wilderness, but we likewise crave safety, not just in the context of the natural world but in the whole of our lives. The former impulse can lead us to conserve, while the latter may prompt us to destroy.”- Richard Telford provides a charming narrative to readers to describe the relationship between humans and nature and its evolution. From humans as prey to humans as predators, the stark contrast in our stance has shifted as a result of modern technology and a large global population. We need to establish a sense of “healthy fear” in order to equalize our relationship with mother nature.

The Ecotone Exchange

The author's rapid sketch of a bobcat (Lynx rufus) spotted outside his study window.  Copyright: Richard Telford, 2015 The author’s rapid sketch of a bobcat (Lynx rufus) spotted outside his study window. Copyright: Richard Telford, 2015

By: Richard Telford

On an early Saturday morning this past January, working at my desk that faces the eastern sunrise, my gaze was arrested by a sudden movement crossing the breaking sun.  My desk window faces a break in the 18th century stonewall that encloses our 1770 northeastern Connecticut farmhouse on three sides; beyond this wall break is a massive brush pile that I have created as I’ve cut back overgrowth along the wall edges to increase light and decrease Lyme tick habitat.  On this particular morning, I experienced a momentary disconnect as I gazed at the unusually stocky, bob-tailed housecat that had broken the line of the emerging sun, quickly realizing that it was, of course, no housecat but instead a bobcat (Lynx rufus).  While bobcats…

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